Zoom

Zoom Installation and Configuration

Description of the video:

Hello and thank you for taking a few minutes to watch our Zoom tutorials. We know that for many of you this will be the first time you've used Zoom to interact with your instructors or with other students. So we wanted to provide a little help. This set of tutorials will walk you through the process of getting Zoom downloaded and installed, show you how to join the Zoom meeting and then give you a little demonstration of some of the basic controls you'll have for interacting with your instructor and with other classmates when you're in Zoom classrooms. Hopefully when we're done, you'll be ready to connect to your classes and you'll feel more comfortable and more confident with how this online learning process will work. >> Let's get started. >> The first thing that you'll need to do is to find a link to the Zoom meeting or classroom. For the purposes of this demo, a link has been placed into the module section of our Canvas site, but your instructor may send you that link via email or through Canvas announcements. If you're having any trouble finding the link, contact your instructor and they should be able to point you in the right direction. Once you have the link, clicking on it will take you to IU's Zoom system. And the first thing that will happen is it will check to see if Zoom has been installed on your machine or not. If it hasn't, that download should start automatically and the small installer will be placed into your desktop. You'll want to run that installer and it will get everything configured so that you're ready to use Zoom. Once everything is set up, it should take you directly into the Zoom meeting. In this particular case, you'll see that the instructor hasn't started the meeting yet. So I get a dialog asking me to wait and that's fine. It gives me an opportunity to test my audio and video settings so that everything's ready to go once the class does start. If I click on the 'test computer audio' button, I get a dialogue that lets me test my speaker and microphone outputs. When I click on this test speaker button, a small tune will be played and I can make sure that my audio levels are set correctly. It sounds pretty good to me, so I'll leave that where it is. I can also test the microphone that's going to make sure that the other people can hear me. When I click on 'Test mic,' it will record for a few seconds and then after it's detected silence, it'll play that recording back. So now I'm testing the microphone. So now I'm testing the microphone. That sounds plenty loud. So I think I'm all set. Also, you'll notice a few configuration options down at the bottom. One of them that you'll want to check is mute my microphone. When joining a meeting for almost all of your classes, they're going to be multiple people in the room. And so starting out by default with your microphone muted means that any background sounds from your house, other people in the house, or pets, things like that won't be distracting from the learning environment. You can always unmute your microphone at any time if you need to speak up or talk. But setting it to mute my microphone when joining a meeting is probably a wise thing. Once your audio has been configured, you can also go in and configure your video settings if you'd like. Many of your classes won't require you to have a video feed, but if you want to make sure that you're ready to go and you have a webcam, you can get that set up. You can play around with the angle, the lighting, whatever it is you need to get set here. And then once you're happy with the way things look, you're good to go. You can close this dialogue and wait for the meeting to start. If you happen to be very early for the meeting, you can also close this dialogue and just come back to the link at a later time.
Joining a Zoom Classroom

Description of the video:

Welcome back. >> Now that you have Zoom configured, we'll take a look at how to enter ZOom classrooms. We'll talk about different ways that you might connect from your computer using audio and video streams, or just using dial in access with a phone If you have bad internet access. We'll also show you what it looks like to be in a waiting room, which is something you might experience before some of your classes start. Once you have Zoom installed and configured, entering meetings is more straightforward, and you click on the link, you'll be taken to the Zoom portal. And you may have to tell your system that it's okay to run Zoom. The very first time you enter a meeting, it's going to ask you for your name. This is the name that will be displayed to your instructor and the other students. So you should just go ahead and type in your full name so that everybody knows who you are. If this 'remember my name for future meetings' is selected, you won't have to complete this step again. When I click 'join the meeting,' one of two things will happen. Either I'll be told that I am placed into a waiting room, which is just the spot where I can hang out until the instructor is ready to let students into the classroom. And again, in this waiting room, you'll see that if I want to, I can go in and do that same audio and video configuration that we looked at in the previous tutorial. Otherwise, I can just hang out in the waiting room until the instructor lets me in. Other instructors may not set up a waiting room, in which case you won't see this dialogue. When you click into the meeting, just instantly jump into the classroom. But for now, we'll just wait. When I entered the meeting, I'll be prompted whether or not I want to join with computer audio or run through that test and configuration set up. Again, since I've already got my audio and video configured, I'm going to click on 'join with computer audio.' It's worth noting though that if you have a slow internet connection or run into any other troubles, you can also join your classrooms via phone. You won't have the same video capabilities. But if you don't have fast Internet access and still want to be able to follow along with the classes and participate. You can click on this phone call option here and you'll receive a list of phone numbers that are available to you to dial in. When you enter that phone number, you'll be prompted to enter the meeting ID, which is listed here. And you'll also be prompted to enter your participant ID right here. And then you'll join the meeting as an audio only stream. Since I do have video access, I'm going to go ahead and join with computer audio. And once I do that, I'm connected to Dr. Jason Gold, the instructor for this meeting. By default what you'll see is that my microphone icon over here has a line through it, which means that it's muted. And that's because I did set up Zoom to mute me automatically when I joined meetings. Also, my video icon has a line through it, which means that I'm not displaying any video. And you can see up here that all that's being shown is my name. If I want to turn the audio on, I can just click on that. And now Jason should be able to hear me. Jason, Can you hear me alright? Can I hear you? Hi Rick; good morning. Hey, perfect. And if I wanted to turn on video, I can also click on 'Start video' here. And what you'll see is up at the top I get a small version of the video screen which shows what Jason and the other participants in the meeting are seeing. Hi Jason. What's up? Not a whole lot. So I'm now going to go ahead and stop that video and we'll go back to just hanging out.
Zoom Student Controls

Description of the video:

Welcome back. >> This third tutorial will cover what it's like to be in a zoom classroom. And we'll talk about the different tools that you have available for interacting with your instructor and your other classmates while you're in the class. So if you've entered a meeting and the instructor doesn't have their video running, or if they're not sharing any resources with you, then this is sort of the default thing that you'll see. It's a pretty bland meeting screen without too much going on. As you saw before, if the instructor has their video running, you'll see their face or whatever they've chosen to show. But the other thing that the instructor will likely do is share resources with you, basically in the same way that they would put them up on a projection screen. Jason, do you want to go ahead and share something with us? >> Sure. There we go. Excellent. >> So what you can see here is that Jason is, has a set of slides that he's presenting and in a typical class then he would be talking over this and we can just listen. And you can think about this process as basically like being in a lecture hall where the instructor is presenting information to you and you're following along. But just like in the class, you may have questions at some point. And zoom provides a couple of different ways that you can interact with your instructor in a small class. And if the instructor has said this is what they want you to do, one of your options would be to unmute your microphone and just interject vocally, and that's fine. But again, in a big class, or in a class even with a small number of people, but no way to signal the instructor that you have a question - that can be a little bit chaotic. So a better option is if you move your mouse around, you'll see a small window appear at the top of the screen and a small window appear at the bottom of the screen that give you access to some controls. One of the important controls that's available is this participant's window. So if I click on the participant's window here, what you'll see is that a dialog box appears that shows me all of the people that are in the classroom. Now there are some important pieces of information that I can get from this. The first is that I can see that Jason Gold is the host of this meeting. This little icon here with the red dot in it means that he's recording the session. And that's just handy because it means he can then provide it, upload it to Canvas later so that people can review it. The microphone icon for him indicates that his microphone is on and active but that he's not speaking at the moment. If you look above that to my microphone, you'll see that the microphone is animated, which means that the system is in fact tracking the fact that I'm talking. And if you look at Dr. Krendall's microphone, you can see that it's red with a slash through it, which means that she's been muted and therefore we're not hearing anything from her. The same is true with these video icons. All three of us currently have our video turned off. So that little video camera has a red slash through it. If my video returned on, it would be well, I'll just show you my video were turned on. Then you'd see that it is a gray icon without the bar. And I would get a little window that shows you my video. I can mute myself directly from this panel if I choose two. And I get a note that says I'd been muted. And if I want to unmute, I can do that here. Where again, I can do that down here, going to turn my video back off, but assuming I don't want to just interrupt with audio, another option, I have to signal the instructor that I have a question or that I'd like to talk just like in the classroom I can raise my hand so you'll see there's a little blue icon here. And if I click on that, you'll see that next to my name. But it's a little blue hand appeared that sends an indication to the instructor that I've raised my hand. So Jason has gotten a little notification that my hand has been raised and he can pause and say, I see that there's a question or I see that Rick has a question. And at that point then I could turn on my audio and ask the question. Or if I decide I don't have a question anymore, I can put my hand back down by clicking on that icon again. Similarly, Jason can put my hand down. So if I click on the raise hand icon when Jason's ready to answer the question, he may then put my hand down. Jason, you wanna put my hand up? >> Hey, there it goes. Thanks, Jason. Yep. Yep. >> No problem. >> There are also other things that I can do to signal, to send signals to the instructor without interrupting with, with a question or something like that. If the instructor asks a question in class that has a simple yes no answer, I can use the icons here that just signal that yes or no. So for instance, Jason may ask, Can everybody hear me okay? And if I can, I can just click on that guess icon. And again, you'll see that I've signaled yes up here next to my name. >> And then once it's done, I think Jason can clear those out or I can clear them out. >> If I can't hear him properly, I can click on the no icon. I can also give a thumbs up or thumbs down or clap my hands. I just have a few ways of interacting through this window that still keep things quiet and don't interrupt the flow of the class. We're going to put that dialogue away. There's another dialogue that may be of use in your classes, and that is the chat window. So they open that chat window, I get a group chat dialog. So this allows me to ask questions via text. But the thing that we need to be really careful about is that by default, that chat message is going to be visible to everyone in the room. >> So anything I type here is visible to all of the students when I type that message in, other people may type back or they might not. Hey, there we go. Hi, Jason and Dr. Krendall. Great. >> If I want instead to just send a question to the instructor, I can click on this everyone option and pick the host of the meeting. And this question is just to Jason. So the other members of the class won't see that. This is another way that you may ask questions during the course of a lecture again, without turning your audio on or interrupting the class. But please be aware that as your instructor is, is presenting the materials in class and interacting with this they have a lot on their plate in terms of thinking about what they're doing with the technology and also presenting the material. So they may not be able to give a lot of attention to the group chat window. They may not see that questions have been asked if that's all that you're doing. And that's why using that participants window to raise your hand makes a lot of sense. So a couple of ways that you might work through this is that if you have a question, you might raise your hand and then type the question into the chat window. Or you might raise your hand and then if the instructor acknowledges that they want you to ask the question, you may un-mute and ask the question that way. You'll have to work with your individual instructors to figure out exactly what the flow for each of your classes is going to be. So one thing you may notice is that if I have the zoom chat window open and the participants window open, it's obscuring some of the material that Jason has been sharing with me. >> But we can fix that too. >> If you, again, if you move your mouse around, you'll see these options available up at the top. And one of them is your view options. If I click on the down arrow there, I can control the zoom ratio for the information that's being shared with me right now. It's set to fit to window, which means it's taking up the entire screen. But I can change that. And exactly what to change it to will really depend on your screen resolution and the instructor screen's resolution and things like that. So if I set this to 50%, for example, you'll see that I now have a bunch of blank space, but I also really can't see at all what Jason has been sharing with me. However, in this particular scenario, if I pick 150%, this gives me a pretty good view of what Jason is sharing. But I can also leave the chat window open and the participants window open so that I can interact with the class without obscuring any of this other view. So feel free to adjust those options for your classes to make sure that you're comfortable with everything that's up on the interface.
Zoom Breakout Rooms

Description of the video:

Welcome back. In this final tutorial, we'll take a look at zooms breakout rooms, a feature that you may use in classes where you're doing group work. We'll show you how they differ from the main meetings and look at some ways that you can share resources with other students so that you can work efficiently. In some of your classes, you may be asked to do group work. And zoom has some features that make that pretty easy. >> So one of the things that your instructor might do is to put you into breakout rooms. >> Jason, do you want to go ahead and send Doctor Kendall and I into a breakout room. >> Okay, here we go. I'm adding a room, and I have to assign you two, and then I open the room. >> And so the first thing you'll see is that you get an invitation to join the room. And when I click "Join," the screen that Jason was sharing goes away and I now have a separate, basically you can think of this as a totally separate Zoom meeting room. >> Even though Jason is the instructor for the course, he is no longer in this room. >> The room is, if I look at the participant list, just Doctor Kendall and I and we're doing our group work. So I can do exactly the same sort of things here that I can do before. I can open up the participants window and check my settings or, you know, indicate things to my other group members that I agree or disagree with something. I can also, if I want to open up a chat window. And in that chat window what you'll see is that the only people in this chat, it's no longer the entire classroom, it's just the people in the group. >> So this really is, you can think of this as a totally separate meeting. >> So one of the things I can do with my group, especially if we're doing group work that requires working on a worksheet or some other collaborative project is that I can share a screen. So if I click on that, close this down for you. If I click on the "Share screen" icon down here at the bottom, I'll be given a list of options. One of them is to share my entire desktop, which means that other people in the meeting will see everything that's on my desktop or I can just share a particular application. So in this case, if I just want to share this word document, I can click on that and then click share. >> And what you'll see is that this Word document now has a green outline around it, which means that other people who are in my breakout room who are in the group can also see this document. >> And then we can talk about the answers to the various questions, decide what to do. You'll notice that when I started the sharing, my chat window went away. But if I take the mouse up to the top of the screen, these controls appear and under more, I have access to the chat window again. >> So we can work on this document collaboratively to this question. >> But also if I want to, I can let other people type answers to this document. >> So up at the top I have this option again for sharing. >> But if I move the mouse into the top area, you'll see an option for remote control. >> And what I can do is give keyboard control to other people in the group. So what I'll do now is say that I want to give Professor Kendall control. >> And even though my hands aren't on the keyboard at all, she should be able to type and move the mouse and control that application. >> Perfect, that sounds ominous. >> So I'm going to go ahead and wrestle control back from Doctor Kendall by turning off that remote control. And now I'm driving again. >> At any point in this processes were working as a group, we may want to ask the instructor for help as well. And so remember that the instructor is not in this group. >> But if I move the mouse up to the top of the screen, I can go to these controls under more if there is an ask for help option, and if I click on that, I will invite the host to the room. >> Now, your instructor may be working with other individuals, so it may be a little bit before they actually can come give help. >> But that's the way that I can signal to Jason that we'd like him to join the room. And you can see the yellow to that request for help. >> And now he's here. >> Now we have all sorts of questions. Jason, you'll also notice that in this chat window, because he is in our group, Jason is now a part of the chat and he can interact with us, right? >> Correct. Great. >> So those breakout rooms give you the ability to do small-group work, to be able to flag, be instructor for the course if you need to get help and to be able to share documents with other people in the group. >> I've been doing this with just Microsoft Word and sharing it. >> Another option may be to open up any of those documents in something like Google Docs so that you can all collaboratively edit them. But these are the basic options available to you in the breakout rooms. Once that group work is done, your instructor can also then end the breakout rooms and bring everybody back to the main classroom. Jason, do you want to shut things down? So when the instructor decides to close the breakout room, you'll get this message that says the breakout rooms are ending. And I can either wait minute or I can click return to the main session. I get a little dialogue that says, I'm going back to the full classroom and now we're in a classroom with all of the other students. Again, note that by default it has muted me when I've moved to the main classroom. So if I want to talk, I'm going to have to unmute again. >> Everybody there? I'm here. >> All right. >> I think that ends the information about the breakout rooms. So we should be all set.

IU Online Keep Learning Course

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